• Canada now has 108,827+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,810+ deaths from the infection and 72,485+ recoveries.
  • COVID consequences: Heart researchers say there’s a surprising reason Canada has seen higher COVID-19 deaths than many countries with fewer health-care resources — more Canadians live longer with chronic disease, putting them at greater risk of dying from COVID-19. Research led by Heart & Stroke also found the pandemic has likely postponed thousands of cardiovascular procedures. CP24 has more.
  • Globally there have now been 13,575,040+ confirmed cases with 584,556+ deaths and 7,596,551+ recoveries.

July 15

  • Ontario will make it easier to build new long-term care homes. The provincial government says the creation of thousands of needed beds has been slow, so a new formula will pay builders more, and include grants to cover up to 17 per cent of up-front capital costs. A spokeswoman for Ontario’s long-term care minister says that money will now fund 8,000 new beds and 12,000 renovated beds.
  • The province is also promising today that all new long-term care facilities, and those being renovated, will have air conditioning.
  • And the province will provide details in the coming weeks on a new plan to build as many as 30,000 beds over the next 10 years.
  • As well, two people at a time can now visit a loved one at a long-term care home during an outdoor visit. Those visitors will no longer be required to take a COVID-19 test. And on July 22, indoor visits will be permitted for up to two people per resident at a time. A COVID-19 test will be required to visit indoors.  
  • Officials said that between 2011 and 2018, just more than 600 new long-term care beds were built in the province.
  • Ontario now has had more than 37,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19. The province reported 102 new cases, the lowest daily count since March, bringing the total to 37,052. The death toll is now 2,732, up nine. Recoveries rose by 195 to 32,920. There are 115 in hospital and 22 in intensive care on a ventilator. There are 1,400 active cases of COVID-19 across Ontario. The province completed 23,769 tests in the past 24 hours.
  • Ottawa Public Health is reporting one new case of COVID-19 raising the city’s total to 2,167. The death toll remains at 263. Three people are in hospital. There are four outbreaks in long term care homes. There are 58 active cases of COVID-19 in the city. So far, 1,846 cases have been resolved.
  • As expected, Ottawa City Council has passed a bylaw that makes face masks mandatory in indoor public spaces. The new bylaw is in effect and brings with it fines for $200 for individuals and $400 for businesses. Council will review the bylaw in August.
  • Under the bylaw for mandatory face masks, you must wear a mask at: restaurants and other eating and drinking establishments, retail locations, places of worship, sports facilities, museums, theatres and other entertainment venues, public areas in hotels and other short-term rental premises, public areas in hospitals and other health facilities, City of Ottawa buildings and facilities, including libraries. Masks are mandatory on all OC Transpo buses, the O-Train, in stations and on Para Transpo Vehicles. The new City of Ottawa face mask policy would cover violations on OC Transpo property.
  • In Quebec there are now 56,859 cases of COVID-19, up 129, with 5,636 deaths, up three, two of which happened before July 7. There are 285 people in hospital, down 10. There have been 26.097 recoveries, up 72.
  • The new case count is the fourth straight day the province has seen more than 100.
  • The Outaouais has seen 628 cases, up one. The death toll remains at 33.
  • Canada now has 108,486+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,798+ deaths from the infection and 72,170+ recoveries.
  • COVID consequences: The WE Charity is launching a restructuring and corporate review. “After much reflection and with great care and concern for all our stakeholders, we have made some important decisions to refocus on our mission, simplify our program offering, and undertake a series of governance and structural changes,” said a statement released by the charity.
  • Anti-lockdown groups have started creating medical cards to be exempt from wearing a mandatory face mask in indoor spaces. Canada’s human rights watchdog says these cards should not be used. The cards may look like they have been authorized by a public health agency. CTV News has more.
  • By the end of April, around 112,000 to 115,000 people crossed land borders into Canada, a 90 per cent drop from the same period last year. But in the last few weeks, that number has grown, reaching about 172,000 in the first week of July, according to public data from the CBSA. 
  • The agency told Global News that this is due to crossings by U.S. citizens and foreign nationals who meet entry requirements, which include immediate family members of Canadians — a recent exception — returning citizens or permanent residents coming home after initial lockdown measures, those travelling for work and study, and essential workers.
  • Canada’s economic growth will not return to pre-pandemic levels until 2022, the Bank of Canada said on Wednesday as it held its key lending rate at 0.25 per cent.
  • Within the last two weeks, at least 26 flights have arrived in Canadian airports with confirmed cases of the virus onboard, Health Canada reports.
  • Globally there have now been 13,287,651+ confirmed cases with 577,954+ deaths and 7,374,484+ recoveries.

July 14

  • Ottawa Public Health is reporting seven new cases of COVID-19 raising the city’s total to 2,166. The death toll remains at 263. Three people are in hospital with one person in intensive care. There are four outbreaks in long term care homes. There are 62 active cases of COVID-19 in the city. So far, 1,841 cases have been resolved.
  • Ontario reported 36,950+ confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, up 111. The death toll stands now at 2,723 deaths, up one. There have been 32,785 recoveries, up 123. There are 1,442 active cases of COVID-19.
  • There are 137 people in hospital, 30 in intensive care on a ventilator. The province completed 16,744 tests in the past 24 hours.
  • Health officials said 96 of the new COVID-19 cases were people younger than 60. The province also reported that the new number of cases did not include anyone more than 80. Fifteen of new cases were people between 60 and 79.
  • The city of Toronto is asking for help in dealing with a forecast $1.35 billion deficit.
  • In Quebec there are now 56,730 cases of COVID-19, up 109, with 5,633 deaths, up five. There are 295 people in hospital. There have been 26,025 recoveries, up 114.
  • The Outaouais has seen 627 cases, up seven. The death toll remains at 33.
  • In an interim report, the Senate finance committee recommends the Liberal government make further improvements to existing programs and better plan for what happens when COVID-19 benefits run out.
  • The report recommends the government consider reducing the amount paid to CERB recipients on a declining scale based on income rather than abruptly turning off the taps on Sept. 30.
  • Senators also say the government should give seriously consider a permanent basic income guarantee.
  • Alberta will be handing out 20 million face masks as the province sees a resurgence on confirmed cases of COVID-19. Despite this, Premier Jason Kenney will not be making masks mandatory, as Quebec has.
  • Canada now has 108,375+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,796+ deaths from the infection and 72,078+ recoveries.
  • The Canadian company, Medicago, said on Tuesday it has begun testing its plant-based coronavirus vaccine in an early-stage clinical trial.
  • A new survey sponsored by the Association for Canadian Studies shows a broad hesitancy among many Canadians to return to so-called “normal life” following the first wave of COVID-19. Thirty-one per cent of respondents across Canada expect that life will “never” return to normal following the pandemic outbreak, while 58 per cent say it will “take time” before they resume normal life. The National Post has more.
  • Another survey done by Leger and the Association for Canadian Studies asked 1,523 Canadians whether they felt the government ought to immediately and quickly begin to scale back pandemic support programs to Canadians and to business. Forty-one per cent said yes to that question, 44 per cent said no and 15 per cent said they didn’t know or preferred not to answer. The survey was conducted between July 10 and 12, just after the Liberals released their projections.
  • COVID consequences: Champlain township council, est of Ottawa, is no longer allowing non-residents to use L’Orignal Beach, on the Ottawa River. Anyone 13 or older who wants to take advantage of the beach must now present identification at the entrance to L’Orignal Park. Boaters from outside the township will be barred from using the park’s boat launch. CBChas more.
  • It is becoming more clear that the ban on non-essential travel between Canada and the U.S. will be banned for another month after July 21. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told reporters talks between the two nations on the ban were continuing and said, “We will have more to say later this week, I’m sure.”
  • Then there’s this: the Professional Bull Riders (PBR) are hoping to bring live action back to audiences in Alberta. On July 23, the PBR will hold back-to-back events which will be closed to the public but broadcast on TSN.
  • Globally there have now been 13,145,302+ confirmed cases with 574,072+ deaths and 7,268,022+ recoveries.
  • Australian states have tightened restrictions on movement as authorities struggle to contain a fresh outbreak of COVID-19 that has pushed the national tally of cases to 10,251+. The death toll is now 110+.
  • Meanwhile, the United States has seen 3,387,053+ cases and 135,984+ deaths. This comes as Texas, Florida and California lockdown parts of their economies.
  • Two states extended border restrictions and Australia’s most populous state, New South Wales, imposed limits on the number of people allowed in large pubs.

COVID-19 by the numbers

Note: The following graphics show cases reported by the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. Numbers may lag behind local reports.

 









Click here for more COVID-19 graphics


July 13

  • A Canadian human trial of a possible COVID-19 vaccine has yet to start because the Chinese government has not approved the sending of Ad5-nCoV to Canada, Canadian authorities say. Health Canada announced May 16 that it had approved Ad5-nCoV for human trials in Canada, to be carried out by the Canadian Center for Vaccinology (CCV) at Dalhousie University in Halifax. So far the Chinese government has not released the vaccine for use in Canada.
  • The federal government will extend the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) program until December. This is the second extension of the subsidy. The extension brings to total on offer from the program to $82.3 billion, almost double the original $45 billion estimate. As of July 6, 581,800 out of a total of 587,060 submissions had been approved. This equates to slightly more than $18 billion.
  • Much of Ontario, including Ottawa, will enter Stage 3 of reopening on Friday, except for public health regions in the Greater Toronto Area, Niagara and Windsor-Essex. According to the provincial plan, Stage 3 will see the reopening of most remaining workplaces and community spaces while carefully and gradually lifting restrictions. This includes dine-in restaurants, bars and cosmetic businesses. Performing arts venues and movie theatres can also reopen with physical distancing. Gatherings of 100 people outdoors and 50 indoors are allowed.
  • Public health advice and workplace safety guidance will remain in place and available.
  • Child care facilities can now have groups of 15 starting July 22, which the province says will mean about 90 per cent of child care needs will be met. As well, outdoor playground can reopen.
  • Businesses such as waterparks, indoor karaoke, amusement parks and nightclubs will not be allowed to reopen.
  • Ottawa Public Health reported 10 new cases of COVID-19 today, raising the total number of cases to 2,159. The death toll remains at 263. Two people are in hospital and one in intensive care. There are 59 active cases and 1,837 cases have been resolved.
  • The province reported 36,839+ confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, up 116. The death toll stands now at 2,722 deaths, up three. There have been 32,663 recoveries, up 129.
  • There are 104 people in hospital, 20 in intensive care on a ventilator. The province completed 20,896 tests in the past 24 hours.
  • Ottawa Public Health reported three new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday for a total of 2,149. Once again no one died from the infection in the city, leaving the toll at 263. There are 50 active cases and 1,836 have been resolved.
  • There are four outbreaks in Ottawa long term care homes: Extendicare Medex Long-term Care Home; Perley and Rideau Veterans’ Health Centre, Rideau Building; Amica Westboro Park Retirement Home and Bairn Croft Residential Services – Mathieu Way.
  • In Quebec there are now 56,621 cases of COVID-19, up 100, with 5,628 deaths, up one. There are 305 people in hospital. There have been 25,25,911 recoveries, up 49.
  • The Outaouais has seen 620 cases. The death toll remains at 33.
  • Starting today, face masks are mandatory on public transit in Quebec. And starting Saturday they will be mandatory in all indoor spaces. There will be fines possible ranging from $00 to $6,000.
  • The Public Health Agency of Canada is adding on-site employees at 36 points of entry, on the Canada-U.S. border. These points of entry — including air and land — see 90 per cent of travellers. Travel across the border has been linked to a small cluster of cases in Prince Edward Island tied to an individual who came from the U.S. on a student visa. CBC has more.
  • The prime minister said he should have recused himself from the cabinet decision to put the administration of a $900 million program to encourage Canadian youth to volunteer for public works in the hands of the WE charity.
  • “I made a mistake,” the PM said.
  • WE has since bowed out of the program which will be administered by bureaucrats. The controversy involving WE has exploded when it was revealed members of Justin Trudeau’s family had been paid for appearances. The federal ethics commissioner is now investigating.
  • Canada now has 107,807+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,787+ deaths from the infection and 71,645+ recoveries.
  • COVD consequences: A new paper from the Bank of Canada shows that 36 per cent of Canadians are continuing to use cash during the COVID-19 pandemic and most have no plans to go cashless any time soon. The report shows that, as before the pandemic, a majority of Canadians use debit cards (52 per cent) or credit cards (62 per cent) when making purchases.
  • Consumer spending in Canada rebounded sharply in the first half of June, thanks in part to tens of billions in government benefits paid to sidelined workers, says a report from the Royal Bank of Canada.
  • Spending from the end of May and through the first half of June was down about 13 per cent from a year earlier. That’s a major improvement from April, when consumer spending was down about 30 per cent.
  • Globally there have now been 13,006,764+ confirmed cases with 570,776+ deaths and 7,001,675+ recoveries.
  • The World Health Organization said today the global pandemic has now killed more than half a million people in six-and-a-half months. WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said there would be “no return to the ‘old normal’ for the foreseeable future”, especially if preventive measures were neglected. “Let me be blunt, too many countries are headed in the wrong direction, the virus remains public enemy number one,” he told a virtual briefing from WHO headquarters in Geneva. “If basics are not followed, the only way this pandemic is going to go, it is going to get worse and worse and worse. But it does not have to be this way.”
  • The World Health Organization on Sunday reported a record increase in the number of confirmed coronavirus cases over a 24-hour period, at more than 230,000. 

July 12

  • Ottawa Public Health reported three new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday. Once again no one died from the infection in the city. Two people are in hospital. There are 50 active cases and 1,836 have been resolved.
  • Hair stylists and barbers in Ottawa received the bulk of tickets handed out for business-related bylaw infractions during the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic, CBC reports.
  • City of Ottawa bylaw officers have charged 16 people since April 3 for operating businesses in ways that contravened COVID-19 restrictions, according to data released by the city.
  • Ontario will learn the details of Stage 3 of reopening on Monday. According to the provincial plan, Stage 3 will see the reopening of most remaining workplaces and community spaces, while carefully and gradually lifting restrictions. Public health advice and workplace safety guidance will remain in place and available. Large public gatherings will continue to be restricted.
  • The province reported 36,723+ confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, up 129. The death toll stands now at 2,719 deaths, up three.
  • There are 1,470 active cases. There have been 32,534 recoveries, up 112. There are 116 people in hospital and 19 in intensive care on a ventilator.
  • The province reported the completion of 25,726 tests on Saturday.
  • In Quebec there are now 56,521 cases of COVID-19, up 114, with 5,627 deaths, up seven. There are 306 people in hospital and 24 in intensive care. There were 89 more recoveries for a total of 25,862.
  • The Outaouais has seen 620 cases, up one. The death toll remains at 33.
  • Canada now has 107,579+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,783+ deaths from the infection and 71,467+ recoveries.
  • Globally there have now been 12,741,287+ confirmed cases with 565,719+ deaths and 6,890,914 recoveries.

July 11

  • The City of Ottawa has seen its largest spike in new COVIDS-19 cases in weeks with 16 reported by Ottawa Public Health today for a total of 2,146. The death toll remains at 236.
  • One person is in hospital. There are 52 active cases and 1,831 infections have now been resolved. There are now four outbreaks at long term care homes.
  • Ottawa Public Health told CTV that the spike in new cases has been caused by: “As you are aware, the daily figures are extracted from our database at 2 p.m. the day before. Please note there was a slight delay in the data extraction yesterday, and the increase in cases in (Saturday’s) report reflect more than a 24-hour period.”
  • Ontario has 36,594+ confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, up 130. The death toll stands now at 2,716 deaths, up six.
  • There are 1,456 active cases. There have been 32,422 recoveries, up 267. There are 128 people in hospital and 18 in intensive care on a ventilator.
  • The province completed 29,522 tests in the past 24 hours.
  • In Quebec there are now 56,407 cases of COVID-19, up 91, with 5,620 deaths, up eight. There are 291 people in hospital and 24 in intensive care. Seventy-eight more people have recovered from the virus, according to Quebec, for total of 25,773.
  • The Outaouais has seen 619 cases, up one. The death toll remains at 33.
  • Canada now has 107,727+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,773+ deaths from the infection and 71,097+ recoveries.
  • Globally there have been 12,576,457+ cases, 561,879+ deaths and 6,740,124+ recoveries.
  • The United States continues to lead the way with 3,285,861+ cases of COVID-19 and 134,410+ deaths from the infection, followed by Brazil (1,800,827+ cases, 70,398+ deaths), India (820,916+ cases, 22,123+ deaths) and Russia (719,449+ cases, 11,188+ deaths).
  • Following the confirmation that Toronto and Edmonton will be the hub cities for a resumption of play expected on Aug. 1, the NHL has announced it has prohibited teams from releasing coronavirus test results and injury information for medical privacy reasons.
  • The NHL and the NHLPA approved “Return To Play” protocols and a new Collective Bargaining Agreement on Friday, with the CBA term running for six years beginning next season.

July 10

  • The Ottawa-Carleton District School Board is telling parents it will urge the Ontario government to allow a five-day in-class school week in the fall.
  • Ottawa Public Health reports two new cases of COVID-19 in the city with no new deaths, leaving the total at 263. Total cases are now 2,130. One person is in hospital and no one is intensive care. There are three outbreaks in long term care facilities. There are 40 active cases of COVID-19 in Ottawa and 1,827 cases have been resolved.
  • Ontario has 36,464+ confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, up 116. The death toll stand now at 2,710 deaths, up seven.
  • There are 1,599 active cases. There are 23 new cases in Toronto, 35 in Peel and 10 in Windsor Essex. There have been 32,155 recoveries, up 178. There are 117 people in hospital and 24 in intensive care on a ventilator.
  • There are 25 outbreaks in long term care homes, down one.
  • The province completed 27,484 tests.
  • Even as case counts drop, Premier Doug Ford said he’s in no rush to move into Stage 3 of reopening. He also said whether bars and indoor dining will be allowed in Stage 3 is yet to be decided. He also said he would like the Canada-U.S. border to remain closed.
  • “We’re going to be very cautious about opening up but eventually we’ll get there,” Ford said during the province’s daily COVID-19 update. Some officials are suggesting Stage 3 could begin next week.
  • Also Friday the Ford government launched Ontario Made, a program promoting locally made products with an investment of $500,000.
  • In Quebec there are now 56,316 cases of COVID-19, up 100, with 5,612 deaths, up three. There are 317 people in hospital and 24 in intensive care. The number of Quebecers who have recovered from COVID-19 is 25,616, up 82.
  • The Outaouais has seen 618 cases, up three. The death toll remains at 33.
  • Statistics Canada reports that the overall unemployment rate was 12.3 per cent, a 1.4 point improvement over May. From February to April, 5.5 million Canadian workers were affected by the COVID-19 economic shutdown. This included a drop in employment of 3.0 million and a COVID-related increase in absences from work of 2.5 million.
  • By the week of June 14 to June 20, the number of workers affected by the COVID-19 economic shutdown was 3.1 million, a reduction since April of 43 per cent.
  • Building on an initial recovery of 290,000 in May, employment rose by nearly one million in June (+953,000; +5.8 per cent), with gains split between full-time work (+488,000 or +3.5 per cent) and part-time work (+465,000 or +17.9 per cent). With these two consecutive increases, employment in June was 1.8 million (-9.2 per cent) lower than in February.
  • The number of Canadians who were employed but worked less than half their usual hours for reasons likely related to COVID-19 dropped by 823,000 in June. Combined with declines recorded in May, this left absences from work 1.4 million above pre-COVID levels.
  • Dr. Vera Etches told Ottawa’s largest school board on Thursday that the risks of COVID-19 have to be balanced against the harm to both students and parents of having schools closed or operating part-time. Her recommendation is that elementary and secondary students return to full-time school in September. The Ottawa Citizen has more.
  • Newfoundland has its first case of COVID-19 in 94 days. The person recently returned from the United States.
  • Canada now has 107,056+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,759+ deaths from the infection and 70,752+ recoveries.
  • Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. says the annual pace of housing starts rose in June as starts of multi-family projects rose, offsetting a decline in single-detached homes.
  • The federal housing agency says the seasonally adjusted annual rate of housing starts came in at 211,681 units in June, up from 195,453 in May. Urban starts of apartments, condos and other types of multiple-unit housing projects rose 13.0 per cent to 154,602 units in June, while urban starts of single-detached homes fell 4.5 per cent to 42,073.
  • COVID consequences: DavidsTea is closing 82 stores across Canada and all its 42 retail locations in the U.S. to focus on e-commerce as well as placement in grocery stores and pharmacies.
  • Globally there have been 12,318,610+ cases, 555,531+ deaths and 6,740,124+ recoveries.
  • A bipartisan group of 29 U.S. lawmakers is urging Canada and the U.S. to “immediately craft a comprehensive framework for phased reopening of the border.”
  • The group also calls for interim measures to ease restrictions on family members and property owners, particularly those with property only accessible through cross-border travel.
  • The letter says: “As members representing congressional districts along the U.S. Northern Border, we understand the importance of prioritizing the safety of our communities as we all navigate the complex calculation of minimizing public health risks and resuming economic activity. However, the social and economic partnership between our two nations necessitates a clear pathway forward. The continual 30-day extensions without a plan for how restrictions will be modified prolongs uncertainty for both communities and creates unnecessary tension as we approach each new expiration and restore the social bond that unites our two nations.”
  • The order closing the border expires July 21. It is expected to be extended.
  • The U.S. is reporting 3,118,168 confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 133,291 deaths.

July 9

  • Ottawa Public Health is reporting four new cases of COVID-19, raising the total to 2,128. The death toll remains at 263. One person is in hospital and one in intensive care. There are 46 actives cases of COVID-19 in the city. There have been 1,819 recoveries. There are still two outbreaks in long term care facilities.
  • Ontario has 36,348+ confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, up 170. Windsor-Essex is responsible for 86 of those cases. Toronto and Peel and 27 and 28 cases. The death total stand now at 2,703 deaths, up three. There are 1,688 active cases and there have been 31,977 recoveries, up 172. There are 123 people in hospital and 23 in intensive care on a ventilator.
  • There are 25 outbreaks in long term care homes, down one.
  • The province completed 26,326 tests.
  • Ontario has extended its COVID-19 emergency orders to July 22. This comes as the Ford government has tabled the omnibus COVID-19 Recovery Act which proposes to change 20 pieces of legislation that govern the province’s schools, municipalities, and justice system. The bill would speed up environmental assessments, offer new consumer protections and help address unemployment. It also creates an economic agency — Invest Ontario — to help attract more international investment to the province. The bill also includes measures announced by Education Minister Stephen Lecce this week to end school suspensions for students in junior kindergarten to Grade 3.
  • A memo from Tony Pontes, executive director of the Council of Ontario Directors of Education (CODE), directs schools across the province to steer away from online learning and maximize children’s time in the classroom this fall.
  • In Toronto, authorities are enacting stricter parking rules at beaches after several nighttime parties were broken up this past weekend.
  • Partygoers reportedly brought DJ equipment, lit bonfires, and participated in excessive drinking while leaving behind heaps of litter.
  • Quebec has seen 56,216 cases of COVID-19, up 137 the most since June 25, with 5,609 deaths, up six. There are 308 people in hospital and 27 in intensive care. The number of Quebecers who have recovered from COVID-19 is 25,616, up 82.
  • The Outaouais has seen 615 cases, up six. The death toll remains at 33.
  • After scenes of large unmasked crowds in some Montreal bars recently, Quebec’s Health Minister Christian Dubé is ordering bars in the province to announce last call at midnight, and to close at 1 a.m. for the time being in order to limit the the spread of COVID-19.
  • Dancing will be forbidden, and patrons must drink while seated.
  • Customer registries may also be required, as well as a maximum capacity of 50 per cent of customers per establishment. There will also be an enhanced police presence near these establishments.
  • Ottawa police are warning cyclists and homeowners to take extra precautions during the COVID-19 pandemic. The force’s break and enter unit says it’s seen a sharp rise in bicycle thefts from sheds, garages and the storage areas of residential buildings. CBC has more.
  • Canada now has 106,840+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,749+ deaths from the infection and 70,574+ recoveries.
  • A new report says the country is ill-prepared to handle a second wave of COVID-19. The Senate’s social affairs committee says the federal government needs to pay urgent attention to seniors in long-term care homes.
  • Prince Edward Island’s chief medical officer of health is reporting one new case of COVID-19 that she says is connected to a recent cluster of cases on the Island. The provincial total is now six.
  • VIA Rail has announced a temporary layoff of 1,000 employees as the rail passenger company has seen a 90 per cent reduction in traffic.
  • A group of health officials, including Dr. David Butler Jones, Canada’s first chief medical officer of health, have written a letter to the prime minister and the premiers saying, among other things, that “elimination of COVID-19 is not a practical objective for Canada until we have a vaccine. While there is hope for a vaccine to be developed soon, we must be realistic about the time it will actually take to develop and evaluate it and then deliver an immunization campaign covering the entire population.  We cannot sustain universal control measures indefinitely.”  
  • Globally there have been 12,107,985+ cases, 550,901+ deaths and 6,533,436+ recoveries.
  • Canada has handled the novel coronavirus outbreak better than many of its allies, including the United States, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Wednesday when responding to new modelling issued by the government showing low cases counts and deaths in Canada.
  • The U.S. today has 3,077,378+ cases of COVID-19 with 132,570 deaths, according to the Johns Hopkins University’s coronavirus case map.

July 8

  • Quite a snapshot: Finance Minister Bill Morneau told the House of Commons today that the federal deficit is expected to reach $343 billion because of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown measures. This is the biggest deficit. The accumulated debt is expected to hit $1.2 trillion by March 2021, up from $765 billion a year earlier.
  • The government is proposing to add $50 billion to the federal wage subsidy program and will add another $10 billion to employment insurance. In all, the government is projecting that, by the end of the 2020-21 fiscal year next March, it will have spent about $469 billion more than planned when it last set spending targets in December 2019.
  • Unemployment will hover at 10 per cent this year and drop to eight per cent in 2021. And that’s if there isn’t another lockdown caused by a second wave of infection.
  • The federal government has also taken a severe hit to revenues. The federal debt to GDP ratio as a result will hit 49.1 per cent in 2020-21.
  • It’s not all bad news: After falling 6.8 per cent this year, the government is predicting a 5.5 per cent rise in GDP in 2021. And low interest rates are helping cut sharply into the federal government’s borrowing costs, a savings of $4 billion.
  • The Public Health Agency of Canada has released new modelling about the pandemic today. It shows that by July 17 could have up to 111,260 confirmed cases and 8,900 deaths. This is based on data collected July 2. The modelling says that Canada’s Rt has been less than one for most of the past 10 weeks, but that effective reproduction number (Rt) has recently risen above one. Community transmission remains low in most of the country and recent fluctuations in Canada’s Rt reflect a small number of local outbreaks, the agency says.
  • In general the modelling suggests the pandemic in Canada is low and stabilizing. The number and severity of cases is falling.
  • The prime minister welcomed the news but warned about the potential for flare-ups of the virus.
  • Canada now has 106,433+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,737+ deaths from the infection and 70,247+ recoveries.
  • Ottawa Public Health is reporting six new cases of COVID-19, raising the total to 2,124. The death toll remains at 263. There are two people in hospital and one in intensive care. There are 47 actives cases of COVID-19 in the city. There have been 1,814 recoveries. There are still two outbreaks in long term care facilities.
  • Once again, Alta Vista ward is leading the way with the has the highest rate of COVID-19 infections in the city according to an Ottawa Public Health update of the report Snapshot of COVID-19 across Ottawa Wards, showing COVID-19 infection rates in all of the city’s 23 wards. As of July 6, Alta Vista ward had 207 confirmed cases of COVID-19 per 100,000 people.  That’s up from 182 confirmed cases of COVID-19 per 100,000 from the report released two weeks ago.
  • Ontario is reporting 36,178+ confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, up 118 in the past 24 hours. The death total stand now at 2,700 deaths, up nine. There have been 31,805 recoveries, up 202. There are now 123 people in hospital and 26 in intensive care on a ventilator.
  • There are now 44 outbreaks in long term care homes.
  • The province completed 22,832 tests in the past 24 hours.
  • Quebec has now seen 56,079, up 82, cases of COVID-19 with 5,603 deaths, up 13. There are 331 people in hospital and 27 in intensive care. The number of Quebecers who have recovered from COVID-19 is 25,534, up 76.
  • The Outaouais has seen 609 cases, up one. The death toll remains at 33.
  • An Edmonton hospital is temporarily closed to incoming patients because of a “full facility outbreak” of COVID-19. So far, 20 patients at Misericordia Hospital have tested positive for the coronavirus along with 15 staff members. Three deaths are related to the outbreak.
  • The Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA) has issued an advisory about potential COVID-19 exposure on an Air Canada flight from Toronto to Halifax. COVID-19 symptoms include: fever (chills, sweats, etc.), cough (new or worsening), sore throat, headache, shortness of breath, muscle aches, sneezing, nasal congestion or runny nose, hoarse voice, diarrhea, unusual fatigue, loss of sense of smell or taste and red, purple or blueish lesions, on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause.
  • COVID consequences: Canadian Heritage has announced it will provide $18.2 million in emergency relief to the National Arts Centre to help cover debts and expenses associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Annabelle Cloutier, spokesperson for the NAC, told CBC that the funding amounts to a “beacon of light” for the arts organization.
  • Opinion: It is time for Canada to make use of its newly invigorated compulsory licensing powers to gain access to the drug remdesivir.
  • Globally there have been 11,910,220+ cases, 546,318+ deaths and 6,506,408+ recoveries.
  • The world’s largest vaccine-maker GSK has put its vaccine booster technology to work in a potential new COVID-19 shot, to be developed with Medicago, a Canadian biopharmaceutical company backed by tobacco company Philip Morris. Medicago’s process takes the leaves of a plant to produce one of the three spike proteins of the novel coronavirus, the S-spike, which can be then used in the vaccine with GSK’s adjuvant. 
  • The United States has roared past three million cases of COVID-19. The current case count according to Johns Hopkins University’s coronavirus map is 3,040,957+ with 132,095+ deaths.
  • This comes as the U.S. formally began to leave the organization still owing about owes an estimated $203 million US as part of its assessed contributions to the WHO for its two-year operating budget, including funds that have yet to be paid for the 2019 operating year.
  • The World Health Organization has acknowledged “emerging evidence” that the coronavirus can be spread by airborne transmission from tiny particles suspended in the air. This follows a letter signed by 239 scientists urging the agency to address the issue.

July 7

  • Ontario is reporting 36,060+ confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, up 112 in the past 24 hours. The death total stand now at 2,691 deaths, up three. There have been 31,603 recoveries, up 177. There are now 131 people in hospital and 24 in intensive care on a ventilator.
  • There are now 46 outbreaks in long term care homes.
  • The province completed 15,112 tests in the past 24 hours.
  • Twenty-eight of Ontario’s 34 public health units reported five or fewer new cases, while 23 of those 28 confirmed no additional cases at all, Minister of Health Christine Elliott noted in a series of tweets. Only Toronto, Peel and York reported 10 or more new cases, with 30, 39 and 10, respectively. 
  • The Ontario government is introducing new legislation to help extend pandemic emergency measures for the next year. The current state of emergency expires July 15. The Ford government intends to introduce a motion Wednesday to extend it until July 24 to ensure there is no gap between the provincial declaration and when the new bill takes effect.
  • The City of Ottawa got some good news on the COVID-19 front today as Ottawa Public Health reported no new cases or deaths, leaving the totals at 2,118 and 263. Two people are in hospital and one person is in intensive care. There are 47 active cases, 1,808 have been resolved and there are two outbreaks in long term care homes.
  • Quebec reported 55,997 confirmed cases of COVID-19, up 60, with 5,590 deaths, up 13. There are 347 Quebecers in hospital with 26 in intensive care. The number of people in Quebec who have recovered from COVID-19 is 25,378, up 32.
  • The Outaouais had 608 cases, up two, and 33 deaths, unchanged.
  • Canada now has 106,107+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,705+ deaths from the infection and 69,747+ recoveries.
  • A new survey conducted by Leger and the Association for Canadian Studies found 72 per cent of Canadians surveyed reported that they are not comfortable flying since top airlines changed their in-flight physical distancing policy which allows all of the seats on a flight to be sold.
  • COVID consequences: Comedian Trevor Noah’s Sorry Not Sorry tour stop in Ottawa has been postponed for a year to Sept. 24, 2021.
  • Clothing retailer Le Chateau, which operates 129 stores in eight provinces as well as some manufacturing operations, says in its latest quarterly report, it may not survive another yer because of the losses incurred during the pandemic.
  • Health Canada has identified counterfeit N95 respirators, which the department says may not provide proper protection.
  • The safety warning says respirators sold by Shanghai Lansheng Light Industrial Products were falsely labelled as approved by the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and may not adhere to that organization’s safety standards.
  • Globally there have been 11,647,399+ cases, 538,796+ deaths and 6,328,000+ recoveries.
  • Despite its stellar record of handling the pandemic, Australia’s second-most populated state Victoria is now considering a four-week lockdown after recording the biggest one-day surge in new COVID-19 cases. The state has not released a case count yet.
  • The number of COVID-19 cases in the state capital, Melbourne, has surged in recent days, prompting authorities to enforce strict physical distancing in more than 30 suburbs and put nine public housing towers into complete lockdown.
  • Israel too is experiencing a surge in cases after containing the pandemic earlier this year.
  • Israel has reimposed a series of restrictions to fight a spike in coronavirus infections, including the immediate closure of bars, gyms and event halls, limits on the number of diners in restaurants to 20 indoors and 30 outdoors, attendance at synagogues is capped at 19 worshippers, and buses can carry up to 20 passengers only. On Monday, Israel registered 1,057 new coronavirus cases and the country’s death toll has hit 338.
  • Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Israel had to reverse course to avoid a wider lockdown that could paralyse its economy, where unemployment is just above 20 per cent. The Bank of Israel has forecast a six per cent economic contraction in 2020.
  • COVID hubris: Brazilian President Jair Bolsonara has tested positive for COVID-19, following months of downplaying the virus. His country has the second most cases of infection behind the United States with 1,623,284+ with 65,487+ deaths.
  • Virus-carrying microdroplets pose more of a danger than is currently being communicated, 239 scientists from 32 countries argue in a new medical commentary. The article has been accepted for publication in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. The scientists are urging the World Health organization to pay more attention to these microdroplets and poor ventilation in enclosed spaces in the fight against COVID-19.

July 6

  • Residents of eastern Ontario,  including the City of Ottawa, will be required to wear non-medical masks in indoor public places starting at 12:01 a.m. Tuesday. The public health order was announced by the medical officers of four local public health units — Dr. Vera Etches of Ottawa, Dr. Paul Roumeliotis of the Eastern Ontario Health Unit (EOHU), Dr. Paula Stewart of Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit, and Dr. Robert Cushman of the Renfrew County and District Health Unit.
  • In Ottawa, the directive will be replaced by a temporary bylaw that city council is expected to approve at its meeting on July 15.
  • Etches told an afternoon news conference that masks should be worn in places such as restaurants, malls, libraries, galleries, sports facilities and common areas in hotels.
  • Masks are already required on OC Transpo.
  • Ottawa Public Health reported eight new cases of COVID-19 in the city today bringing the total to 2,118. There were no new deaths leaving the toll at 263. Three people are in hospital, one is in intensive care. There have been 1,801 recoveries. OPH says there are 54 active cases, up seven. There is now just one outbreak in a long term care home — the Perley and Rideau Veterans’ Health Centre.
  • City of Ottawa run day camps are open today. Children will be screened by mask and face shield-wearing camp leaders as they arrive, and groups will be capped at eight campers with two supervisors.
  • Ontario is reporting 35,948+ confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, up 154 in the past 24 hours. For the first time since late March, there have been no new deaths reported leaving the total at 2,689 deaths. There have been 31,426 recoveries, up 160. In this report, Toronto and Peel had 59 and 43 cases, respectively.
  • There are now 118 people in hospital and 21 in intensive care on a ventilator.
  • There are now 34 outbreaks in long term care homes, down one.
  • The province completed 17,303 tests in the past 24 hours.
  • Premier Doug Ford said Monday legislation is being prepared to speed up in infrastructure projects such as highways, major transit and affordable housing. 
  • The government also intends to enter work with commercial partners to build “transit-oriented communities” built around transit. 
  • The last two parts of the province, Leamington and Kingsville in the Windsor Essex region, still not in Stage 2 of reopening will get to join the group Tuesday.
  • Windsor-Essex has seen a surge of cases among temporary farm workers in the Leamington and Kingsville areas, but only four have been confirmed in the past 24 hours.
  • Ford says he will visit the Windsor-Essex region in the coming days to thank the community for its patience.
  • Quebec’s health minister says the province will put a police presence around bars in major urban centres and won’t hesitate to close them down if public health measures are not followed.
  • On the weekend there a slew of media stories about bar patrons, staff and owners not respecting distancing guidelines. In one case, patrons who tested positive for COVID-19 and who visited a crowded bar on Montreal’s South Shore.
  • “What I have seen in the past few days is not acceptable,” Dube told reporters in Montreal Monday. CTV has more.
  • Quebec reported 55,937 confirmed cases of COVID-19, up 74, with 5,577 deaths, up three. There were 377 Quebecers in hospital with 25 in intensive care. The number of people in Quebec who have recovered from COVID-19 is 25,378, up 32.
  • The Outaouais now has 606 cases, up eight, and 33 deaths, unchanged.
  • Montreal will soon see a mandatory mask order. Mayor Valérie Plante announced the move on Monday afternoon, saying the city is working on a new bylaw and aims to put it into effect by July 27.
  • Canada now has 105,763+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,687+ deaths from the infection and 69,431+ recoveries.
  • There are no new cases of COVID-19 in Prince Edward Island. The island is experiencing its first five cases of the infection since April 28.
  • In Nova Scotia, health officials have placed a man who entered Canada from the U.S. under a federal quarantine order. He travelled from Toronto to Halifax before being stopped at the Confederation Bridge into P.E.I. He has tested positive for COVID-19.
  • Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will not travel to Washington to meet with U.S. President Donald Trump and Mexican President Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador.
  • COVID consequences: A survey of executives by the Bank of Canada shows Canadian business sentiment is at its lowest level since the 2008-09 recession.
  • The central bank polled businesses between May 12 and June 5. Many are still struggling with weak demand. Companies reported growing slack in capacity, easing price pressures and collapsing sales expectations.
  • Globally there have been 11,471,225+ cases, 534,787+ deaths and 6,161,729+ recoveries.
  • The NHL and NHL Players’ Association have agreed on protocols for training camps and games. This is a major step towards the resumption of the season later this summer. 

July 5

  • Ottawa Public Health reported four new cases of COVID-19 in the city today bringing the total to 2,110. There were no new deaths leaving the toll at 263. Three people are in hospital, one is in intensive care. There have been 1,800 recoveries. OPH says there are 47 active cases. There are still two outbreaks in long term care homes.
  • Ontario is reporting 35,794+ confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, up 138 in the past 24 hours. There have now been 2,689 deaths, up two, and 31,266 recoveries, up 183.
  • There are now 139 people in hospital and 23 in intensive care on a ventilator.
  • There are now 35 outbreaks in long term care homes, down one.
  • The province completed 23,792 tests in the past 24 hours.
  • Quebec reported 55,863 confirmed cases of COVID-19, up 79, with 5,574 deaths, up eight. There were 371 Quebecers in hospital with 26 in intensive care.
  • The Outaouais now has 598 cases, up two, and 33 deaths, unchanged.
  • Canada now has 105,535+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,684+ deaths from the infection and 69,239+ recoveries.
  • There are five active COVID-19 cases in P.E.I. The province hadn’t identified a new case since April 28. By May 8, it had no active cases.
  • Four of the cases are connected to an asymptomatic individual who travelled to Nova Scotia, where he was in contact with a someone who was recently in the U.S. One of the cases involves a woman who worked at a long term care home. The province has subsequently tested the entire home save for a few individuals.
  • Chief public health officer Dr. Heather Morrison said that the man made the trip to Nova Scotia for personal reasons on June 26, and returned June 29, but didn’t self-isolate.
  • The national immunity task force has started testing thousands of blood samples for COVID-19 antibodies and should be able to produce a more detailed picture of how many Canadians have been infected with the novel coronavirus within a couple of weeks. CBC has more.
  • Globally there have been 11,304,534+ cases, 531,659+ deaths and 6,030,374+ recoveries.

July 4

  • Ontario is reporting 35,656+ confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, up 121 in the past 24 hours. There have now been 2,687 deaths, up five, and 31,083 recoveries, up 174.
  • There are now 150 people in hospital and 26 in intensive care on a ventilator.
  • There are now 36 outbreaks in long term care homes, down eight.
  • The province completed 21,425 tests in the past 24 hours.
  • Ottawa Public Health has reported two new cases of COVID-19 for a total of 2,106. The death toll remains at 263. There are three residents in hospital and one in intensive care. There are 46 active cases and so far there have been 1,797 recoveries.
  • Ontario is reporting 35,656+ confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, up 121 in the past 24 hours. There have now been 2,687 deaths, up five, and 31,083 recoveries, up 174.
  • There are now 150 people in hospital and 26 in intensive care on a ventilator.
  • There are now 36 outbreaks in long term care homes, down eight.
  • The province completed 21,425 tests in the past 24 hours.
  • Ottawa Public Health has reported two new cases of COVOD-19 for a total of 2,106. The death toll remains at 263. There are three residents in hospital and one in intensive care. There are 46 active cases and so far there have been 1,797 recoveries.
  • Health officials in Kingston have reported another three cases of COVID-19 as of Saturday. The region’s total now sits at 105 cases, most linked to a nail salon. One of the new cases is tied to the salon.
  • The City of Ottawa has closed Somerset Street W. between Bank and O’Connor on weekends.
  • Quebec reported 55,784 confirmed cases of COVID-19, up 102, with 5,566 deaths, up six. There were 375 Quebecers in hospital with 27 in intensive care.
  • The Outaouais now has 596 cases, up one, and 33 deaths, unchanged.
  • Demonstrations organized by the Migrant Rights Network were held Saturday in Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver and Halifax at the offices of members of Parliament, including the office of federal Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino.
  • The demonstrators and advocates want permanent residency for all non-permanent residents in the country to give them the ability to protect and care for themselves and their families during the pandemic. Global News has more.
  • Canada now has 105,306+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,674+ deaths from the infection and 68,708+ recoveries.
  • Globally there have been 11,906,093+ cases, 525,491+ deaths and 5,890,052+ recoveries.
  • The U.S. is celebrating July 4 with 2,847,469 confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 131,509 deaths and 864,762 Americans have recovered from the infection.

July 3

  • Ontario is reporting 35,535+ confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, up 165 in the past 24 hours. There have now been 2,682 deaths, up two, and 30,909 recoveries, up 179.
  • There are now 155 people in hospital and 40 in intensive care on a ventilator.
  • There are now 44 outbreaks in long term care homes.
  • The province completed 24,194 tests in the past 24 hours. Ontario Health Minister Christine Elliott said that 14 of the province’s public health units have reported no new cases of COVID-19.
  • Ontario has deployed its emergency management team to Windsor-Essex to combat a spike in cases on farms among temporary workers. The team is working with members of the Canadian Red Cross in the area, along with Public Health Ontario. Over the weekend, a single Essex County greenhouse — Nature Fresh Farms in Leamington, Ont. — saw almost 200 workers test positive for COVID-19.
  • Ontario Premier Doug Ford said the rest of the province could enter stage three of reopening by the end of July.
  • Hospitals in Ottawa are asking the province to approve plans to create hundreds of new long-term care and transitional beds at local retirement homes to free up acute-care space. CBC has more.
  • Mayor Jim Watson and Coun. Keith Egli, chair of the board of health, have revealed that City Council will vote on a motion to make face masks mandatory in Ottawa July 15. Ottawa will join other cities in the province including Toronto, Kingston and Hamilton. Premier Ford says he will not impose a provincewide mask because of local differences in COVID-19 cases.
  • Ottawa Public Health is reporting three new cases of COVID-19, raising the local total to 2,104. The death toll remains at 263. Three residents are in hospital, one is in intensive care. There are 43 active cases and 1,798 cases have been resolved. There are two outbreaks in long term care facilities.
  • The City of Ottawa is reopening some in-person municipal services, including child-care centres will resume starting Monday, with new COVID-19 protocols in place. Childcare centres will also reopen. Client service centres at Ottawa City Hall, 110 Laurier Ave. W., and Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Dr., will reopen by appointment for marriage licences, Commissioner of Oaths, OC Transpo products/Presto payments, access to information requests, building permit application drop-offs, building permit issuances and payments and Yellow Bag purchases for small business that participate in City waste and recycling collection.
  • The public’s “blatant disregard” for the rules of social distancing has resulted in the town council of Wasaga Beach planning to shut down the majority of the main beach area on Lake Huron by July 9. The only access permitted would be three walkways to reach the water, and so the public can access businesses along what was Beach Drive. Anyone who chooses to flout the new rules by walking on the municipal portion of the beach will also face a $750 fine. The rules do not apply to Wasaga Beach Provincial Park.
  • The premier said he would not impose a ban on beaches because of overcrowding, including in Ottawa at Mooney’s Bay beach on Canada Day.
  • The Ontario Crown Attorneys Association is seeking an injunction to delay the province’s plans to reopen 44 courthouses on July 6.
  • The association alleges the province’s attorney general, and the management board of cabinet that represents Crowns in labour relations, have not taken every precaution to protect workers in courthouses during the pandemic.
  • “These precautions include the mandatory wearing of masks and other administrative measures to protect the employees and other persons against contracting the virus,” said a notice of application filed in the Superior Court of Justice on Friday. The union wants the delay so the issue can be dealt with by an arbitrator.
  • Members of Canada’s military are leaving seven Ontario long-term care homes where they have been deployed for the last two months. The Ontario government said that “the final team concluded its work today” and thanked the military for providing support to Orchard Villa in Pickering, Altamount Care Community in Scarborough, Eatonville Care Centre in Etobicoke, Hawthorne Place in North York, Holland Christian Homes’ Grace Manor in Brampton, Downsview Long-Term Care Home in Toronto and Woodridge Vista Care Community in Vaughan.
  • Quebec reported 55,682 confirmed cases of COVID-19, up 89, with 5,560 deaths, up 19. Twelve deaths occurred before June 25. There were 392 Quebecers in hospital with 31 in intensive care.
  • The Outaouais now has 595 cases, up four, and 33 deaths, unchanged.
  • Canada now has 105,014+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,663+ deaths from the infection and 68,534+ recoveries.
  • The federal Liberal government and the WE Charity are ending a partnership that would have seen the charity distribute around $900 million in federal student grants this summer. The divorce was announced in a media release from Youth minister Bargish Chagger and a statement from WE. The arrangement between the federal government and WE caused controversy because of the close involvement of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his partner Sophie Gregoire-Trudeau in the charity’s activities.
  • The prime minister said WE made the decision to drop out. Trudeau called the uproar “unfortunate” and said he has been committed to help youth since before entering politics.
  • The prime minister announced $150 million in infrastructure projects in British Columbia.
  • Justin Trudeau also announced a $40 million injection into the union-led training program for skilled trades people.
  • The federal cabinet will meet in retreat next week to discuss pandemic preparedness and other issues. Also next week the Finance Minister will present a “snapshot” look at the economy mid-pandemic.
  • The prime minister said one condition attached to the $14 billion for the provinces would include day care for children under age six and programs for children over the age of six so parents can return to work more easily.
  • Ontario Premier Doug Ford says conditions Ottawa is imposing on its proposed $14-billion COVID-19 bailout package are holding up an agreement with the provinces and territories that would allow the cash to flow.
  • “Just cut a cheque, give us the flexibility,” Ford said Thursday. “The magical word is flexibility.”
  • In the wake of a decision by Air Canada and WestJet to fill all seats on a plane, health authorities in British Columbia are warning passengers on four recent flights into Vancouver International Airport of possible exposure to COVID-19.
  • The prime minister said the government is looking into the ending of regional air routes in Canada by Air Canada. He deplored the decision and said the government is talking to the airline about the changes.
  • The Atlantic travel bubble is now open. Residents of the four Atlantic provinces can now travel mostly without restriction within the region.
  • The Toronto Blue Jays will hold training camp in Toronto in advance of a shortened major league baseball season. The team will isolate in the hotel complex that is part of SkyDome.
  • Some Canadians driving cars with U.S. licence plates say they’ve endured vandalism, harassment and even a minor assault from fellow Canadians convinced that they’re Americans illegally in Canada. CBC has more.
  • Globally there have been 10,906,822+ cases, 522,122+ deaths and 5,767,410+ recoveries.
  • With the July 4 holiday looming, several U.S. states are urging people to stay home and avoid large crowds. The U.S. has now seen 2,741,869+ cases and 128,783+ deaths.
  • Britain is allowing travellers from dozens of countries to arrive without self-isolating for 14 days, but Canada and the U.S. are not on the list. Canada did make the grade for the European Union.

July 2

  • Ontario is reporting two days of COVID-19 numbers today. The province now has 35,370+ confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, up 299 over the past 48 hours. There have now been 2,680 deaths, up eight over two days, and 30,730 recoveries, up 386.
  • There are now 119 people in hospital and 26 in intensive care on a ventilator.
  • There are now 46 outbreaks in long term care homes.
  • Ottawa Public health is reporting seven new cases of COVID-19 in the city, raising the total to 2,101. There have been no new deaths, leaving the toll at 263. There are three residents in hospital and one in intensive care. There are two outbreaks in long term care homes.
  • Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson will help reopen the Ottawa Art Gallery to the public on July 9. The gallery will formally open on July 8 which is being set aside as a special day reserved for all frontline workers.
  • A large greenhouse operation in southwestern Ontario has seen 191 cases of COVID-19 among temporary farm workers. The operation is Nature Fresh in Leamington, Ont. The operation is under public health orders to isolate and stop working until further notice. 
  • The province completed 50,378 tests in the past two days.
  • Quebec now has seen 55,593 confirmed cases of COVID-19, an increase of 69. There have been 5,541 deaths, up 14 in the past 24 hours. Six of these deaths occurred before June 24. There are 411 Quebecers in hospital with 322 in intensive care.
  • The Outaouais has 591 cases and 33 deaths. Both unchanged.
  • Canada now has 104,455+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,615+ deaths from the infection and 67,774+ recoveries.
  • The launch of a COVID-19 contact tracing app in Ontario has been delayed.
  • Globally there have been 10,694,288+ cases, 516,210+ deaths and 5,480,394+ recoveries.
  • The U.S. monthly jobs report shows an increase of 4.8 million jobs bringing the unemployment rate to 11.1 per cent.
  • The number of confirmed cases in the U.S. has now reached 2,686,587+ and the death toll has hot 516,786+. The U.S. has seen more than 50,000 cases in the past 24 hours.

July 1

  • Canada now has 104,455+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,615+ deaths from the infection and 67,774+ recoveries.
  • Quebec reports 55,524 confirmed cases of COVID-19, up 66. There have now been 5,527 deaths, up 24. There are 422 Quebecers in hospital and 33 in intensive care.
  • The Outaouais has 591 cases, up five, with 33 deaths, unchanged.
  • Ontario has 35,068+ confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, as of Monday’s report. There have been 2,672 deaths and 30,344 recoveries. The province is not reporting on Canada Day.
  • Ottawa Public Health did report eight new cases of COVID-19. The total is now 2,094. The number of deaths is unchanged at 263. Two are in hospital and one is intensive care. There are 46 active cases in the city and there have been 1,785 recoveries. There re two outbreaks in long term care facilities.
  • In Windsor-Essex, the medical officer of health has shut down a farm where 191 temportary workers have tested positive for COVID-19.
  • It’s Canada Day today, one like no other. The pandemic has caused the cancellation of the annual celebration on Parliament Hill which has moved online.
  • The Ottawa shows will be streamed at midday and in the evening, followed by virtual fireworks.
  • The federal government has conducted mostly remote inspections of Ontario farms that employ migrant workers, instead of physically entering the properties to make sure the labourers’ living conditions are safe. CBC has more.
  • Globally there have been 10,512,383+ cases, 512,331+ deaths and 5,387,249+ recoveries.
  • The United States has bought up virtually all of the stocks of the drug remdesivir, one of just two proven to work against COVID-19 – for the next three months. The Guardian has more. The U.S. now has 2,732,594+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 130,030 deaths and 840,649 recoveries
  • The United Nations World Food Program says it is ready to help 138 million people in low and middle income countries. This would be the largest number ever for the WFP.
  • A vaccine developed by the German biotech firm BioNTech and U.S. pharmaceutical giant Pfizer has shown potential and was found to be well tolerated in early-stage human trials, the companies said on Wednesday. The drug is one of 17 being tested on humans in a frantic global race to find a vaccine the world is counting on to end a pandemic that has infected 10.5 million people and killed more than 500,000 so far.

June 30

  • Ontario now has seen 35,068+ confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, up 157. That’s the largest increase in several days and the first time more than 200 cases in a week.. There have been 2,672 deaths, up seven, and 30,344 recoveries, up 148. There are 213 in hospital, 34 are on a ventilator in intensive care. Ontario has 2,052 active cases of COVID-19.
  • Ontario completed 23,759 tests in the past 24 hours. There are 55 outbreaks in long term care homes, down one.
  • On Tuesday, 99 of the 157 cases were from Toronto, Peel and York Region, while 17 were from Windsor-Essex, which saw 177 cases reported on Monday. Half of Tuesday’s new infections were detected in people aged 20 to 39.
  • In his annual report, Ontario’s Ombudsman Paul Dubé says the pandemic will “provide countless lessons, as well as opportunities to strengthen them in future. ” The year 2019-2020 was “a year like no other.”
  • Ottawa Public health reports no new cases of COVID-19 and no new deaths. The totals remain at 2,086 cases and 263 deaths. One person is in hospital and one in intensive care. There are 40 active cases and 1,783 have been resolved. There are now four outbreaks at long term care homes in the city.
  • Ottawa Public Health and the City of Ottawa are discussing a bylaw that would make masks mandatory in indoor spaces. A decision is expected by the end of the week. CBC has more.
  • Toronto city council has voted to make face masks mandatory in public spaces beginning July 7. The city has already made them mandatory on public transit. Peel Region, too, has made masks mandatory indoors.
  • The province is not following suit because mask wearing isn’t necessary everywhere in Ontario, says Premier Doug Ford.
  • On Monday, Quebec reported 55,458 confirmed cases of COVID-19, up 68. There have now been 5,503 deaths, up 18. There are 435 Quebecers in hospital and 45 in intensive care.
  • The Outaouais has 586 cases with 33 deaths, both unchanged.
  • Quebec is making face masks mandatory on public transit in the province for individual 12 and up starting July 13. Those without a mask will not be able to board a bus or train after a two-week grace period.
  • Canada now has 104,455+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,591+ deaths from the infection and 67,528+ recoveries.
  • The federal government has extended the 14 day mandatory quarantine for travellers coming to Canada to July 31.
  • COVID consequences: Statistics Canada reports that real gross domestic product dropped 11.6 per cent in April, following a 7.5 per cent decline in March. April marked the first full month of measures put in place to slow the spread of COVID-19. All 20 industrial sectors of the Canadian economy were down, StatsCan said, producing the largest monthly decline since the series started in 1961. The economy was 18.2 per cent below its February level, the month before the COVID-19 measures began.
  • Preliminary information indicates a 3.0 per cent increase in real GDP for May. 
  • Cirque du Soleil has filed for creditor protection. The company has announced the termination of approximately 3,480 employees previously furloughed in March.
  • Cineplex Inc. says the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a $178.4-million loss in the first quarter.
  • Revenues decreased 22.4 per cent to $282.8 million from $364.6 million as attendance plunged to 10.7 million from nearly 15 million. Cineplex has 1,687 screens at 164 locations across Canada. They went dark March 16.
  • Globally there have been 10,424,992+ cases, 509,706+ deaths and 5,235,908+ recoveries.
  • The European Union has release a list of 14 countries whose citizens can travel to and inside the community. Canada is on the list along with Australia and Japan. The United States, Brazil, India and Russia are not. The list will be reviewed every 14 days and new countries may be added and some taken off the list, depending on the coronavirus statistics.
  • Sixteen American states have halted their economic reopening and some have rolled the reopenings back. The U.S. now has 2,683,000+ confirmed cases with 129,545+ deaths.
  • Brazil now has 1,368,195 cases with 58,314 deaths.
  • Russia has 646,929 cases and 9,306 deaths.
  • India has 566,840 cases and 16,893 deaths.
  • Dr. Anthony Fauci testified before Congress today and warned the U.S. could soon see 100,000 news cases of COVID-19 a day unless people begin to wear masks and physically distance themselves.
  • Yikes: Researchers in China have discovered a new form of swine flu that can infect humans, and they believe it has the potential to cause a future pandemic. This swine flu has been dubbed the G4 virus and it’s related to the H1N1 flu that caused widespread illness in 2009.

June 29

  • In new modelling, Public Health Canada projects up to 108,130 cases of COVID-19 and 8,865 deaths by July 12.
  • Dr. Theresa Tam says regular briefings on the pandemic in Canada will now take place twice a week because the current situation is stable and under control.
  • Ontario now has seen 34,911+ confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, up 257. That’s the largest increase in several days and the first time more than 200 cases in a week.. There have been 2,665 deaths, up seven, and 30,196 recoveries, up 89. There are 232 in hospital, 35 are on a ventilator in intensive care.
  • Ontario completed 27,127 tests in the past 24 hours. There are 56 outbreaks in long term care homes, up one.
  • In today’s report, 177 of the confirmed cases were in the Windsor-Essex public health unit following targeted testing of migrant farm workers over the weekend.
  • Three temporary workers have died of COVID-19 since the outbreak began, two in Windsor-Essex and another in the Haldimand Norfolk health unit.
  • Kingston’s medical officer of health says there are now 27 confirmed COVID-19 cases linked to the outbreak at a nail salon in the city. Six staff, six clients and close contacts that include an employee at a second salon are positive. There are about 700 people asked to self-isolate.
  • COVID consequences: The owner of Flora Hall Brewing, has asked the City of Ottawa to consider allowing breweries, restaurants and pubs that don’t have patio space to operate “pop-up” establishments in city parks. CBC has more.
  • Ottawa Public health reports three new cases of COVID-19 and no new deaths. The totals are 2,086 cases and 263 deaths. One person is in hospital and one in intensive care. There are 43 active cases and 1,780 have been resolved.
  • Ottawa Bylaw officers have begun enforcing parking limits. Ticketing was suspended on St. Patrick’s Day as COVID-19 was spreading in the city.
  • The Royal Canadian Mint has created a medal to recognize “essential workers and everyday heroes.” The medal will sell for $10 and benefit The Breakfast Club of Canada.
  • The federal government has extended the Canada Emergency Commercial Rent Assistance (CECRA) program by one month. The program was initially intended to support small businesses during the months of April, May, and June. The CECRA provides unsecured forgivable loans to qualifying commercial property owners to reduce the rent owed by their small business tenants that have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The program is also intended to help owners meet operating expenses on commercial properties. The CECRA, which is being administered through the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, allows the federal and provincial governments to help cover 50 percent of the rent, with tenants and landlords paying the outstanding amount.
  • The CECRA is also being facilitated through the provinces and territories and property owners are required to opt into the CERCA for businesses to benefit.
  • Quebec is now reporting 55,390 confirmed cases of COVID-19. The province has started to issue daily reports again. The province has recorded 311 cases since its last report on June 25. There have now been 5,485 deaths, up 37 since June 25. There are 455 Quebecers in hospital and 45 in intensive care.
  • Alberta Premier Jason Kenney has announced a two per cent corporate tax rate cut (from 10 per cent to eight per cent) and will spend $2 billion on infrastructure with a goal to create 50,000 jobs this year.
  • Canada now has 103,918+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,566+ deaths from the infection and 67,114+ recoveries.
  • The JUNO Awards will be handed out tonight. The ceremony will be livestreamed. There are several Ottawa nominees: the National Arts Centre Orchestra, bass baritone Gerald Finley, the Ottawa Bach Choir, bass baritone Philippe Sly, composer Vincent Ho, fiddler extraordinaire April Verch and Silla + Rise, who blend traditional Inuit throat singing with electronic dance music.
  • Globally there have been 10,199,798+ cases, 502,947+ deaths and 5,169,421+ recoveries.
  • China’s military has approved a coronavirus vaccine for use within its ranks that has been developed by its research unit and a Hong Kong based biotech firm called Hong Kong-listed CanSino Biologics. More than half of 17 candidate vaccines identified by the World Health Organization (WHO) that are in clinical evaluation involve Chinese companies or institutes.
  • The Ad5-nCoV is one of China’s eight vaccine candidates approved for human trials at home and abroad for the respiratory disease caused by the new coronavirus. The shot also won approval for human testing in Canada.
  • Broadway theatres will not reopen until January 2021.
  • India has set a record for COVID-19 infections with 20,000 in the past 24 hours.

July 28

  • In Ontario, the case count has reached 34,654, an increase of 178. The death toll now stands at 2,658, up six. There have been 30,107 recoveries, up 175. There are 214 Ontarians in hospital with COVID-19 and 36 people are on a ventilator in intensive care. There are 55 outbreaks in long term care facilities, down two, where 1,809 residents have died.
  • Ontario completed 28,633 tests in the past 24 hours.
  • Ottawa Public Health reported four more cases of COVID-19, bringing the total to 2,083. The death toll remains at 263. There are two people in hospital and one in intensive care. There are 44 active cases. So far, there have been 1,776 recoveries. There are now six outbreaks in long term care facilities.
  • OC Transpo will resume its full summer service, including reinstating all bus routes across the city.
  • The City of Kingston is setting up a one-day testing clinic at St. Lawrence College today, with priority given to anyone who may have been exposed to the virus at Binh’s Nails and Spa and their close contacts. It is believe up to 700 people have been exposed. There have now been 22 confirmed cases of COVID as a result of this outbreak.
  • Meanwhile an employee at a second nail salon in Kingston, Kingdom Nails & Spa, has tested positive.
  • “Although we have passed all regulations and did not violate [any] safety measures, we feel that it is our responsibility to ensure that this will not happen again,” the company’s Facebook post reads. “We will be closed until the public health department says that we can open.”
  • Canada now has 103,210+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,552+ deaths from the infection and 66,152+ recoveries.
  • COVID consequences: Vancouver Coastal Health is warning anyone who visited Brandi’s Exotic Show Lounge on Hornby Street in downtown Vancouver on the evenings of June 21, 22, 23 and 24 that they may have been exposed to the coronavirus.
  • Everyone who attended the club between 9 p.m. and 3 a.m. on each of those nights, including the hours between midnight and 3 a.m. on June 25, is asked to monitor themselves for COVID-19 symptoms for 14 days.
  • In one of the most complicated drafts ever, the Ottawa Senators landed the No. 3 and No. 5 picks in the annual NHL draft. A to-be-named-later team will get the first overall selection expected to be 18 year old Alexis Lafreniere.
  • Globally there have been 10,072,643+ cases, 500,321+ deaths and 5,085,018+ recoveries.
  • Canada has contributed $300 million towards the international fight against COVID-19.
  • In the United States, confirmed cases continue to surge. There are now 2,591,303+ along with 127,674+ deaths and 786,923+ recoveries. The U.S. Health Secretary, Alex Azar, has warned that “the window [of opportunity to take effective action] is closing,”

June 27

  • In Ottawa, the number of new COVID-19 cases continues to be below 10. Ottawa Publuc Health says that there were four new confirmed cases of infection in the past 24 hours and no new deaths. The total number of cases is now 2,079. The death toll stands at 263. There are 47 active cases and two people are in hospital, one person is in intensive care.
  • The COVID-19 outbreak at the City of Ottawa run Garry J. Armstrong long-term care home has been declared over. There are still six active outbreaks at Ottawa’s long-term care homes and group homes: Peter D. Clark long-term care home; Montfort Long-Term Care Home; Perley Rideau Veterans’ Health Centre; St. Louis Residence; The Glebe Centre and Welcome House.
  • The City of Ottawa says the last resident of the Peter D. Clark Long-term Care Centre to have COVID-19 has died. Two staff members are still positive.
  • Mooney’s Bay, Westboro and Petrie Island beaches are now open. Lifeguards will be on duty from noon to 7 p.m. until Aug. 30. Britannia Beach will remain closed for the season for dredging of the riverbed.
  • Ottawa Public Health has resumed water testing for potentially harmful bacteria such as E. coli, and will post the water quality results. If necessary, the city of Ottawa will post any no-swim advisories. 
  • In Ontario, the case count has reached 34,476, an increase of 160. The death toll now stands at 2,652, up eight. There have been 29,932 recoveries, up 178. There are 252 Ontarians in hospital with COVID-19 and 35 people are on a ventilator in intensive care. There are 57 outbreaks in long term care facilities where 1,807 residents have died.
  • The Ottawa-Carleton District School Board is planning for an “adapted model” that will include a mixture of in-class and at home learning for students.
  • In a letter to families, sent Friday, the current plan being discussed would include two days of in-class learning per week, with the student body split into two groups. Schools would be deep cleaned in between. CTV has more.
  • Ontario completed 33,492 tests on Friday, a new daily high, the health ministry says.
  • The province has extended its emergency orders to July 10. The orders, which were set to expire on June 30, allow healthcare providers and public health units to redeploy staff.
  • The province has removed some restrictions around indoor sports and recreation facilities to allow people to train and exercise.
  • The provincial emergency declaration had already been extended until July 15.
  • Kingston’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Kieran Moore has issued a public health order requiring a mask to be worn inside any indoor public setting. The health unit says any failure to comply with the mandatory face mask requirement will result in a $5,000 a day fine for businesses. There are some exemptions for very young children and those with breathing difficulties.
  • This follows an outbreak at a nail salon in the city which has seen 16 infections and 500 people urged to self-isolate.
  • In Quebec, the new health minister says the province will resume releasing daily data on COVID-19, beginning Monday, after a public outcry over plans to begin releasing data once a week.
  • The news comes as Quebec has opened bars, spas, water parks and casinos — nearly every kind of business in Quebec — can reopen, subject to safety precautions such as physical distancing, wearing a mask and washing hands. 
  • There will still be no festivals or other large gatherings this summer, no sleepaway camps, and sports that involve close-contact fighting will not be allowed to resume.
  • Canada now has 104,732+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,568+ deaths from the infection and 65,726+ recoveries.
  • Globally there have been 9,871,711+ cases, 495,781+ deaths and 4,983,029+ recoveries.

June 26

  • The National Gallery of Canada has announced it will reopen on July 18. The gallery says in a media release that it will open Thursdays to Sundays. In addition, the gallery boutique will be open. The gallery says precautions will be taken to protect staff and visitors.
  • On a day when Ontario completed 30,780 tests, the province recorded its lowest count of new confirmed COVID-19 cases since March. There were 111 new cases reported in the past 24 hours for a total of 34,316+. There have been 2,644 deaths an increase of just three. There have been 29,754 recoveries, up 226. There are 256 people in hospital with coronavirus infections.
  • Ottawa Public Health is reporting six new cases of COVOD-19 and one new death. The total cases are 2,075 and deaths are 263. There are two people in hospital and one in intensive care. There are 47 active cases and there have been 1,765 recoveries.
  • Ottawa’s medical officer of health is hopeful Ottawa could move into Stage 3 of Ontario’s COVID-19 reopening plan by the fall. There has been no spike in COVID-19 cases in Ottawa since bar and restaurant patios, malls, barber shops and hair salons opened two weeks ago, Dr. Vera Etches told CTV.
  • There are now 18 confirmed COVID-19 cases flowing out of an outbreak at a Kingston, Ont., nail salon. A further 680 people have been told to isolate.
  • Toronto’s annual Pride Parade, one of the largest in North America, is going virtual this year.
  • The OMA says some 4,000 “individuals and groups” representing more than 12,500 health-care workers reported problems with personal protective equipment inventory in May, and that supply remains an ongoing issue. CBC has more.
  • A new survey done for the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) and carried out by L’Observateur, suggests that 70 per cent of respondents in Quebec participate in frequent handwashing, 95 per cent in physical distancing, and 93 per cent in coughing etiquette (coughing into one’s elbow).  
  • When it comes to wearing a mask, less than half of respondents – 42 per cent – said they’ve been doing so regularly in public. While 82 per cent of Quebecers aged between 18 and 34 believe there will be a second wave of the virus, only 27 per cent of them said they’ve been wearing a mask. CTV has more.
  • Quebec is reopening casinos, amusement and water parks, spas, hotels and bars today, but it is not reporting new cases and death numbers.
  • British Columbia and Alberta are allowing movie theatres to open today.
  • Canada now has 102,733+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,507+ deaths from the infection and 65,652+ recoveries.
  • WestJet says it will end its seat distancing protocol on domestic flights starting July 1. The airline says because its flights have HEPA filters installed to clean recirculated air and the air flow in cabins flows from the ceiling to the floor, it did not need the extra barrier.
  • PPE update: According to the Public Services and Procurement Canada website, as of June 16, 55.7 million face shields had been ordered but 17.6 million received; more than a billion pairs of gloves ordered, 42.3 million received; 126.6 million gowns ordered, 4.6 million received; 20.4 million litres of hand sanitizer ordered, 7.1 million litres received.
  • Canada has ordered 121.9 million of the coveted N95 respirators and 340.8 million surgical masks, though 12.9 million and 110.9 million respectively had been received. Of the 40,328 ventilators ordered, just 367 had been received.
  • Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canadian companies are now producing so much personal protective equipment that Canada is almost at the point of being self-sufficient.
  • Globally there have been 9,641,472+ cases, 490,632+ deaths and 4,865,562+ recoveries.
  • The head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control estimates there are about 24 million Americans infected with COVID-19. The U.S. is reporting 2,425,814+ cases along with 124,509+ deaths, according to the Johns Hopkins University COVID-19 tracking map.

June 25

  • On the day the Windsor-Essex region, except Leamington and Kingsville, enters Stage 2 of reopening, Ontario has now reached 34,205+ confirmed cases of COVID-19, an increase of 189 cases. There have now been 2,641 deaths from the infection, up 10. There have been 29,528 recoveries, up 191.
  • All customers at a Kingston, Ont. nail salon are being told to get tested for COVID-19 after an outbreak of the novel coronavirus.
  • The Medical Officer of Health for Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington has declared a COVID-19 outbreak at Binh’s Nails and Spa salon at 500 Gardiners Rd. in Kingston. Ten cases of COVID-19 have been linked to the salon, including four staff members.
  • Ontario completed 27,511 tests in the past 24 hours. There are now 57 outbreaks in long term care homes, down from 62. The province will continue to release daily numbers, said Health Minister Christine Elliott.
  • Dr. Theresa Tam says she plans to seek more information from Ontario about the province’s plan to allow some COVID-19 positive migrant farm workers with no symptoms to return to their jobs.
  • Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer said during a daily briefing that protocols that separate COVID-19 positive and negative workers must be stringent.
  • Canadian farmers rely on some 60,000 temporary foreign workers predominantly from Latin America and the Caribbean.
  • Ottawa Public Health says in a report that 66 per cent of new COVID-19 cases in Ottawa are from racialized groups, while 26 per cent of Ottawa’s population are identified as a visible minority.
  • Dr. Vera Etches says areas in Ottawa with the highest proportion of recent immigrants or racialized minorities have rates of COVID-19 almost twice that of areas with the fewest recent immigrants or racialized minorities. (The data excludes COVID-19 cases in long-term care homes, retirement homes, hospitals, shelters and group homes). CTV has more. Ottawa Public Health is collecting data retrospectively to have a more comprehensive socio-demographic picture of the COVID-19 situation in the city.
  • Ottawa Public Health has also created a page on its website to offer information on COVID-19 resources that are available to Indigenous peoples in the community.
  • OPH is reporting four new COVID-19 cases and no new deaths. One resident remains in hospital and one other is in intensive care. There have been 1,752 recoveries.
  • Quebec has announced a decision to no longer post daily COVID case and death counts starting on Friday. Going forward the province will release weekly reports.
  • Meanwhile, the province has seen 55,079 cases, up 142 and 5,448 deaths, up seven.
  • In the Outaouais, there have now been 581 cases, up three and 33 deaths. That is unchanged.
  • The prime minister announced details of the Canada Student Service Grant, which was originally announced in April. That will give students and recent graduates between $1,000 and $5,000 for volunteer work. Students volunteering 100 hours will get the $1,000; 200 gets $2,000 and so on. The grant was announced in April and is now coming into effect. To find groups need volunteers, the government has created a portal.
  • The government will also create 10,000 summer jobs for young people between 15 and 30.
  • Other details revealed today: $40 million to create 5,000 internships for post-secondary students with the innovation-focused NGO Mitacs to offer placements in sectors such as medicine and law; $266 million to create 20,000 job placements for post-secondary students in high-demand sectors through the Student Work Placement Program; $40 million on a wage subsidy that connects youth with small businesses and charities through the Digital Skills for Youth and the Computer for Schools Plus programs; and $187 million to support job placements through the Youth Employment and Skills Strategy in high-demand sectors. 
  • The federal government also announced the investment of $109 million in 139 research projects into COVID-19.
  • Canada now has 102,574+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,501+ deaths from the infection and 65,362+ recoveries.
  • A report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information shows that as of May 25, LTC residents made up 81 per cent of all reported COVID−19 deaths in the country compared to an average of 42 per cent among all countries studied.
  • The data compares Canada’s record to that of 16 other countries in the Organization for Economic Co−operation and Development. The proportion of LTC deaths ranged from less than 10 per cent in Slovenia and Hungary to 31 per cent in the United States to 66 per cent in Spain.
  • At 5,324, the reported number of LTC deaths in Canada, the report says, was near the average but data varied widely among countries: from 28 in Australia to 30,000 in the U.S., with more than 10,000 in France, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom.
  • In response, the prime minister acknowledged the death toll as unsatisfactory, and pointed the finger at the provinces for their “failure” to protect seniors. He said the federal government will be there to help.
  • Ontario Premier Doug Ford expressed shock at the prime minister’s statement and added that the federal government needed to step up with more funding.
  • Canada has lost its AAA debt rating at the world’s three major credit agencies. Fitch Ratings announced Wednesday it’s downgrading the country’s debt to the second-highest rating, AA+, because of increased debt.
  • COVID consequences: Chinese authorities have begun random testing of imported food after a COVID-19 outbreak in Beijing was traced to a cutting board used on imported Atlantic salmon at the Xinfadi market in Beijing.
  • The inspections have shut down live lobster shipments from Canada, valued at $457 million last year, because of a fear of loss of the lobsters while awaiting clearance.
  • Export Development Canada says trade confidence among Canadian exporters hit an all-time low in its latest survey. The federal export credit agency says its trade confidence index fell to 56.0 compared with 69.3 at the end of 2019.
  • WestJet Airlines Ltd. says it will permanently lay off 3,333 employees as part of a major restructuring amid the pandemic.
  • Globally there have been 9,457,902+ cases, 483,217+ deaths and 4,716,476+ recoveries.
  • As COVID cases spike in some U.S. states, former hot spots, New York, New Jersey and Connecticut are asking visitors from outside to self-quarantine for 14 days.
  • The U.S. reported more than 34,000 new cases of COVID-19 for a total of 2,395,759+ and 122,177+ deaths from the infection.
  • A limited study, published in Nature Medicine, shows that in 37 asymptomatic and 37 symptomatic COVID-19 patients in the Wanzhou District of China, researchers found that antibody levels were lower in asymptomatic patients and began to decline in as little as eight weeks after the patients leaving the hospital.

June 24

  • The City of Ottawa reports it is on track for a $192 million deficit because the COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically reduced revenues. That could lead to cuts in services.
  • Ottawa Public Health reports four new cases of the infect, raising the city’s total to 2,065. There has been one new death raising the total to 262.
  • Ottawa Public Health has produced a breakdown of the presence of COVID-19 infection in the city’s wards. Snapshot of COVID-19 across Ottawa Wards report shows Alta Vista has 182 confirmed COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people, the most in the city. Based on data from June 22, the report shows all 24 wards have faced infections.
  • Rideau-Rockcliffe is second, with 167 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people, followed by River Ward at 135 cases per 100,000 people. Barrhaven, Rideau-Vanier and Bay wards have 131 cases per 100,000 people.
  • West Carleton-March has the lowest rate of infections, at 59 cases per 100,000 people. Bay Ward has the highest number of cases linked to outbreaks in long-term care homes and retirement homes with 207 cases.
  • More than four million people can have a meal on a patio in Ontario today as Toronto and Peel enter Stage 2 of the reopening of the provincial economy.
  • Ontario is announcing a three-point plan to deal with COVID-19 outbreaks among temporary workers on farms in Windsor-Essex. This will include stepped up testing, some benefits for infected workers and improved job security for temporary workers.
  • As well, most of the Windsor-Essex region will move to Stage 2 of reopening on Thursday. Leamington and Kingsville will remain in Stage 1. Many of the farm infections are being reported in and around these communities. There have been about 1,000 cases of COVID among the farm workers detected by testing.
  • As the openings happen, Ontario reported 163 new cases of COVID-19, raising the provincial total to 34,016+. There have been 2,631 deaths, up 12. There have been 29,336 recoveries, up 229. The province completed 23,207 tests in the past 24 hours. There are now 62 outbreaks at long term care facilities.
  • Quebec has now seen 54,937+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. That’s an increase of 53. There have been 5,441 deaths, up 17. There have been 23,710 recoveries.
  • In the Outaouais there have been 578 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and there have been 33 deaths.
  • Canada now has 102,179+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,528+ deaths from the infection and 65,023+ recoveries.
  • There have been more than $13 million in fines handed out for violations of COVID-19 rules, the Canadian Civil Liberties Association says in a report called Stay off the Grass: COVID-19 and Law Enforcement in Canada. Quebec accounted for 77 per cent of the reported fines, while Ontario saw 18 per cent and Nova Scotia three per cent.
  • The report finds that marginalized or other vulnerable groups tended to bear the brunt of police and bylaw action.
  • According to the study by the association and the Policing the Pandemic Mapping Project co-founded at the universities of Toronto and Ottawa, police and bylaw officers issued at least 10,000 tickets or charges related to the pandemic between April 1 and June 15.
  • Starting July 3, residents of the region will be able to travel freely in a bubble created by the four Atlantic provinces.
  • Globally there have been 9,273,773+ cases, 477,807+ deaths and 4,613,425+ recoveries.
  • The International Monetary Fund says it now expects global gross domestic product to shrink 4.9 per cent this year, more than the three per cent predicted in April. For 2021, the fund forecast growth of 5.4 per cent, down from 5.8 per cent.
  • The IMF sees Canadian GDP in 2020 at -8.4 per cent and 4.9 per cent in 2021.
  • Major League Baseball plans a July 24 return.
  • The United States has seen the largest number of confirmed COVID-19 cases reported since late April, the height of the pandemic in New York State. More than 35,000 cases emerged in the past 24 hours. The cases are spiking in states such as Texas, Arizona, California and Florida. The U.S. has now seen 2,348,956+ cases with 121,279+ deaths.

June 23

  • Ontario is reporting 33,853+ cases of COVID-19, up 216. There have been 2,619 deaths, up 10 and 29,107 recoveries, up 174. One of the deaths was the first in Ontario of a child. She had the infection but did not die from it.
  • The province has completed 16,189 tests below the target of 20,000 a day.
  • There are 66 outbreaks in long term care institutions, down two.
  • This is the third time in the past 12 days that the number of confirmed cases has topped 200.
  • Health officials say 168 (78 per cent) of the new infections are in Toronto, Peel Region, York Region, and Windsor-Essex. There are 63 new cases in Toronto, 46 in Peel Region, 27 in York Region and 32 in Windsor-Essex.
  • Twenty-seven of Ontario’s 34 local public health units reported five or fewer cases on Tuesday, with 17 reporting no new cases at all.
  • Ottawa Public Health is reporting five new cases of COVID-19 and the first death in several days in Ottawa. There now have been 2,061 confirmed cases of coronavirus and 261 deaths, 1,746 cases are resolved. Two residents are in hospital, one in intensive care.
  • Ontario’s Education Minister unveiled a new math curriculum for elementary students that will take effect this fall. The new math will be on top of massive changes in the school system caused by COVID-19.
  • On Monday, Premier Doug Ford blasted farmers in southwestern Ontario for not ensuring temporary workers were tested for COVID-19. On Tuesday he changed his tune.
  • Ford said his government “will have more to say (Wednesday) on a plan going forward” regarding the protection of migrant workers.
  • “We are doing everything we can right now to help you and I’m 100 per cent behind our farmers and I will always have your backs,” he said. “But, I need your help as well. We have to make sure that testing is available to our farmers and to the workers, that’s our best defence right now. So, I will say this again, if you’re working on a farm and you’re worried about COVID-19, please go get tested.”
  • Thus far, more than 1.2 million novel coronavirus tests have been conducted throughout Ontario.
  • The Art Gallery of Ontario will reopen to members and annual pass holders on July 2. On July 23 those buying single tickets can come in to seem the collection and exhibitions featuring the photography of Diane Arbus and one called Illusions: The Art of Magic showing 55 colourful posters from the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
  • Canadian Heritage is sending $25.7 million to nine cultural institutions under the Museum Assistance Program. The recipients include the National Gallery of Canada, the Museum of Science and Technology, the Museum of Nature, The Aviation Museum, the Museum of History, the War Museum, Pier 21 in Halifax, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg and the National Battlefields Commission.
  • A study by Ottawa Public Health shows 62 per cent of people infected with COVID-19 in Ottawa were employed in the health-care sector, most of them in long-term care.   
  • Sales and service workers made up the next largest group, accounting for 13 per cent of those who declared their occupation. Next came a broad category including teachers, police officers, jail guards and social workers, who made up 11 per cent the total. 
  • The Madonna Care Community, where two health-care workers died and 60 became ill with COVID-19, failed to ensure nurses had better protection against infection, a court-appointed arbitrator has ruled. The Ottawa Citizen has more.
  • The National Capital Commission (NCC) says the daily closure of the Queen Elizabeth Driveway, and the weekend closures on the Sir John A. Macdonald and Sir George-Étienne Cartier Parkways, will continue until Sept. 7.
  • Quebec has now seen 54,884+ confirmed cases of COVID-19, up only 49. There have been 5,424+ deaths, up seven.
  • The Outaouais has no new cases leaving the total at 576 cases and the death toll remains the same at 33.
  • Canada now has 101,902+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,488+ deaths from the infection and 64,334+ recoveries.
  • It’s estimated that about 124 of the 1,381 Royal Canadian Legion branches across Canada are likely to close permanently, and another 357 are facing financial hardship. CTV has more.
  • The parliamentary budget officer reports this year’s federal deficit could hit $256 billion due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • The PBO bases its estimates on a total of $169 billion in federal spending on emergency aid and a historic drop in economic output. The office says the economy could shrink by 6.8 per cent in 2020, the weakest since 1981. The number is similar to other estimates.
  • The overall deficit figure is $3.8 billion higher than previous predictions because of a better economic outlook in the second half of the year. Previously, Giroux estimated the economy could shrink by 12 per cent in 2020.
  • The parliamentary budget officer estimates the eight-week extension of the Canada Emergency Response Benefit will cost $17.9 billion. The total cost will now be $71.3 billion. The original cost was $60 billion. About $43.51 billion has been paid out to 8.41 million people as of June 4.
  • The Finance Department has lowered the cost for the wage-subsidy program to $45 billion from $73 billion. The PBO report says the wage subsidy will cost $55.6 billion.
  • The federal government says the supply of personal protective equipment is stabilizing and the purchase of PPEs will now return to a competitive bidding process.
  • The federal government is extending the length of time that employees in federally-regulated private sector workplaces can be laid off, before their employment is deemed terminated. For employees laid off prior to March 31, 2020, the time period is extended by six months or to December 30, 2020, whichever occurs first. For employees laid off between March 31, 2020, and September 30, 2020, the time period is extended until December 30, 2020, unless a later recall date was provided in a written notice at the time of the layoff.from three months to six.
  • A new poll conducted by Leger and the Association for Canadian Studies has found that two thirds of Canadians don’t want to see physical distancing measures relaxed.
  • A new study ranking countries for safety amid the pandemic places Canada 12th, behind top-ranked Switzerland, Germany, Israel, Singapore and Japan.
  • Globally there have been 9,124,193+ cases, 472,683+ deaths and 4,385,705+ recoveries.
  • The tennis star Novak Djokovic has tested positive for COVID-19 after hosting a tennis tournament. Three other tennis players at his Adria Tour exhibition tournament have also tested positive.

June 22

  • New data from a survey of 500 Chinese Canadians by the non-profit Angus Reid Institute in partnership with the University of Alberta reveals the extent and depth to which these citizens have been exposed to discriminatory behaviours.
  • Half (50 per cent) report being called names or insulted as a direct result of the COVID-19 outbreak, and a plurality (43 per cent) further say they’ve been threatened or intimidated.
  • Three-in-ten (30 per cent) report being frequently exposed to racist graffiti or messaging on social media since the pandemic began, while 29 per cent say they have frequently been made to feel as though they posed a threat to the health and safety of others.
  • A majority believe Canadians blame people of Chinese ethnicity for COVID-19 and just 13 per cent believe others in this country view them as fully Canadian “all the time”.
  • Toronto and Peel can now move into Stage 2 of reopening starting on Wednesday. That means, restaurant and bar patios, shopping malls and pools can open. This leaves Windsor-Essex as the lone region stuck in Stage 1.
  • The cases in the region are being driven by infections among temporary workers on farms.
  • Mexico has agreed to allow temporary workers to return to Canadian farms after a deal was reached for improved safety precautions against infection from COVID-19.
  • Meanwhile a third migrant worker has died at a farm run by Scotlynn Group, a large-scale farming operation in Vittoria, Ont.
  • At least 199 migrant workers at the farm have tested positive for the virus, as well as 18 other people in association with Scotlynn Group.
  • About 500 Canadian Forces members have ended their service in long term care homes in Ontario.
  • In Ontario, the number of news cases continues to be well below 200 a day with confirmed cases now at 33,637+, up 161 cases. There have been 28,933 recoveries, up 214 and 2,609 deaths and increase of just three.
  • The province completed 21,900 tests in the past 24 hours.
  • In the City of Ottawa, the longest running outbreak in a long term care home is now over. After 10 weeks and the deaths of 59 residents, the outbreak at Carlingview Manor ended June 18, Ottawa Public Health reports. The outbreak was declared April 7, it included 170 cases among residents and 89 among staff.
  • Ottawa Public Health reports there have been 2,056 cases so far, up one, and no new deaths leaving the toll at 260 fatalities. Three residents remain in hospital and 1,744 have recovered.
  • Quebec has now seen 54,835+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been no new deaths leaving a total of 5,417+. The last time Quebec saw no deaths was March 19.
  • The Outaouais has seen 576 cases and 33 deaths.
  • The province is allowing gyms and cinemas to reopen for up to 50 people. Restaurants in the Montreal area can now open.
  • Manitoba is allowing bars and restaurants to reopen to full capacity. The province has 20 active cases of COVID-19.
  • Saskatchewan is moving into Stage 4 of its reopening plan.
  • Canada now has 101,637+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,436+ deaths from the infection and 64,334+ recoveries.
  • Most federal public servants will be working remotely for the foreseeable future — some even permanently — as individual departments take up the task of bringing back their most critical staff first, according to new return-to-work guidelines from the Treasury Board of Canada.
  • Treasury Board President Jean-Yves Duclos said the return will be gradual, will vary by department and will put health and safety first.
  • There are no government-wide standards and no dates are included in the guidelines, though Duclos did say he thinks the first public servants can return shortly.
  • Gov.-Gen. Julie Payette has cancelled the next round of Order in Canada appointments.
  • Parks Canada is now allowing camping in national parks. Canadians with existing reservations will be able to stay overnight at sites with new reservation opportunities available online in the coming weeks.
  • COVID consequences: CBC reports that data on work refusals reported to provincial labour authorities shows there’s been a spike in the number of people who have formally refused to work citing dangerous conditions. But virtually none of those work refusals are being upheld, which may illustrate just how unprepared existing labour laws are for dealing with COVID-19.
  • Globally there have been 8,795,922+ cases, 463,811+ deaths and 4,385,705+ recoveries.
  • World Health Organization (WHO) chief Tedros Adhanom and Ghebreyesus warned Monday of the potential consequences of world leaders “politicizing” the coronavirus pandemic, saying political divisions would hamper a proper response to the virus.
  • “The greatest threat we face now is not the virus itself, it’s the lack of global solidarity and global leadership,” Tedros said, according to The Associated Press. “We cannot defeat this pandemic with a divided world.”

June 21

  • Ottawa Public Health is reporting one new case of COVID-19 in the city and no new deaths. This means there have been 2,055 cases so far and 260 fatalities. Two residents remain in hospital and 1,742 have recovered.
  • In Ontario there have now been 33,476+ confirmed cases of COVID-19, up 175, and 2,606 deaths, up 11. More than 85 per cent of cases have resolved. There have 28,719 recoveries, up 251.
  • Ontario completed 23,408 tests.
  • In Ottawa, a staffer at the Peter D. Clark long-term care home has tested positive for COVID-19, bringing the total to 24. Six employees and one resident have active cases.
  • The executive director of the ByWard Market BIA suggests one of the biggest challenges facing business owners during the COVID-19 pandemic is finding employees to work. CTV has more.
  • Quebec has now seen 54,766+ confirmed cases of COVID-19, an increase of 92. There have been 5,417+ deaths, up nine.
  • The number of cases in the Outaouais remains at 576 with the death toll holding at 33.
  • Canada now has 101,337+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,430+ deaths from the infection and 63,866+ recoveries.
  • Globally there have been 8,795,922+ cases, 463,811+ deaths and 4,385,705+ recoveries.

June 20

  • Ottawa Public Health has reported five new cases of COVID-19 bringing the city’s total to 2,054. No new deaths have been reported. The toll remains at 260.
  • Three residents are in hospital, one in intensive care. and 1,736 people have recovered leaving only 58 active cases.
  • Ontario has now seen 33,301 confirmed cases of COVID-19, up 206, with 2,595 deaths from the infection, up 31. So far there have been 28,468 recoveries, up 218. More than 85 per cent of all cases have been resolved.
  • The province completed 27,387 tests in the past 24 hours.
  • Quebec has now seen 54,674+ confirmed cases of COVID-19, an increase of 124. There have been 5,408+ deaths, up 33.
  • There have now been 576 cases in the Outaouais with 33 deaths.
  • Canada now has 100,959+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,410+ deaths from the infection and 63,450+ recoveries.
  • VIA Rail says passengers will be required to wear masks to reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19 starting on Tuesday.
  • Globally there have been 8,629,272+ confirmed cases with 459,714+ deaths and 4,277,519+ recoveries.
  • Major League Baseball, with at least 12 major-league players and staff members testing positive for COVID-19, has shut down spring training facilities in Arizona and Florida.

June 19

  • Ontario now has seen 33,085 confirmed cases of COVID-19, up 178. There have been 28,250 recoveries, up 246. There have now been 2,564 deaths, up 31.
  • The province completed 27,225 tests in the past 24 hours. There are 66 long term care facilities experiencing outbreaks, down one.
  • Ontario Education Minister Stephen Lecce said the province wants school boards prepare three separate plans for September.
  • A plan for regular in-class instruction with heightened health protocols.
  • The continuation of remote learning with more standardization. This would happen should school closures be extended, or if some parents choose not to send their child back to school, the province says.
  • An adapted delivery model, which blends in-class with online learning, which would see students alternating being in class by days or weeks.
  • Lecce said in the latter situation, class sizes wouldn’t exceed 15 students in class at a time.
  • Ottawa Public Health has reported six new cases of COVID-19 bringing the city’s total to 2,049. No new deaths have been reported. The toll remains at 260.
  • There are only three residents in hospital and 1,731 people have recovered leaving only 58 active cases.
  • It is now 100 days since lockdown measures were imposed in Canada and the country has 100,622+ confirmed cases of COVID-19. There have been 8,346 deaths from the infection and 62,984+ recoveries.
  • In his morning briefing, this time from Chelsea, Quebec, the prime minister said that businesses need to support and respect workers in response to questions about grocery chains removing the $2 an hour bump in pay because of the pandemic.
  • A Commons committee has asked representatives of Loblaws, Metro and Sobeys to appear to answer questions about the removal of this “danger” pay.
  • The City of Ottawa’s long-term care director says it has hired 91 more workers for the four long-term care homes it manages during the pandemic. 
  • Quebec Finance Minister Eric Girard says the provincial economy will shrink 6.5 per cent this year because of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown.
  • The province will record a $14.9 billion deficit during fiscal 2020-2021. The province saw a 9 per cent decrease in revenues.
  • Quebec spent more than C$6.6 billion on financial support to mitigate the impact of coronavirus and expects an estimated decrease of C$8.5 billion in revenues during fiscal 2020-2021.
  • Quebec has now seen 54,550 confirmed cases of COVID-19, up 167. There have been 5,375 deaths, up 35, 30 of which occurred before June 11.
  • A 60-year-old man from Surrey, B.C. faces mischief charges charged with mischief after his flight was diverted to Winnipeg because he refused to wear his face mask when requested and because he lit up a cigarette on board and refused to put it out.
  • Face masks are now required on flights in Canada.
  • Several NHL players have tested positive for COVID-19 including Toronto Maple Leafs star Auston Matthews and several unnamed players and staff from the Tampa Bay Lightning. This comes as the federal government has cleared the way for a Canadian city to participate in the relaunch of the NHL season.
  • The Toronto Blue Jays have closed their spring training facility in Florida after a player tested positive for COVID-19. Five members of the Philadelphia Phillies have also tested positive.
  • COVID consequences: Retail sales were down by 26.4 per cent in April to $34.7 billion, Statistics Canada says and sales have fallen by 33.6 per cent since physical distancing measures were implemented in mid-March. Motor vehicle and parts dealers took the largest hit in April, while online sales surged to a record high, representing 9.5 per cent of the total retail market.
  • Essential retailers such as supermarkets and other grocery stores, convenience stores, pharmacies, gasoline stations and beer, wine and liquor stores remained open with reduced hours, most Canadian retailers did not offer in-store shopping in April. Nevertheless, many retailers started or expanded their online presence and curbside pick-up services in response to the closures.
  • About a third of retailers were closed during April. The average length of shutdown was eight business days. In the clothing and clothing accessories sector, 70.1 per cent of retailers were closed in April for an average of 20 days.
  • Globally there are now 8,519,543+ cases with 454,582+ deaths and 4,184,445+ recoveries.
  • Coronavirus cases are spiking in India which has recorded 13,586 infections in the past 24 hours. India has now seen 380,532+ confirmed cases, 163,248+ are active. There have been 12,573+ deaths.
  • In the United States, as Donald Trump is about to return to the campaign trail in Tulsa, Oklahoma, the case count is 2,234,449+. The death toll is now 120,210+ and the recoveries have reached 698,788+.

June 18

  • In Ontario there are now 32,917+ cases of COVID-19, up 173. There have now been 2,533 deaths. So far, 28,004 people have recovered, an increase of 220.
  • Ontario has completed 25,278 tests.
  • Canada has now passed 100,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 reaching a total of 100,220+ cases on Thursday. There have been 8,300 deaths from the infection and 62,496+ recoveries.
  • The federal government is now testing a contact tracing app in Ontario to help find those who might have been exposed to COVID-19. The app has been developed in partnership with Canadian tech companies Shopify and BlackBerry. The app is to be available in early July.
  • Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said no location services will be used on the app, stating “the privacy of Canadians will be fully respected.”
  • The prime minister said his government has also been working with other provinces, pointing to British Columbia, specifically, on launching the contract tracing app. He said it is to become available nationwide in the coming weeks.
  • Ontario Premier Doug Ford said later the app will alert Ontarians if they’ve been exposed to someone infected with COVID-19 in the last 14 days.
  • In Ontario, relatives can now begin to visit their family members in long term care facilities.
  • In Ottawa, the Byward Market and the Parkdale Market are now open.
  • Toronto has now seen 1,000 deaths from COVID-19.
  • Dr. Eileen de Villa, the city’s medical officer of health, called the death toll a “tragic milestone.
  • Meanwhile, Ottawa Public Health reports seven new cases of COVID-19 in the city for a total of 2,043. There were no deaths from the infection in the past 24 hours for a total of 260. Seven people are in hospital with COVID-19. There are 68 active cases and 1,715 have been resolved.
  • The City of Ottawa is cancelling large indoor and outdoor events at municipal facilities until the end of July due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • All municipal facility rentals for indoor events of 100 or more people and outdoor events of 250 or more people will be cancelled for July.
  • The city will consider rentals of indoor space for up to 10 people on a case-by-case basis. Sports fields can be booked for events of up to 10 people, under the condition that sports teams and clubs follow the guidelines of their governing organizations.
  • All existing arena bookings until August 3 have been cancelled.
  • The NAC and RBC Bluesfest have teamed up for a weekend drive-in concert series called “#CanadaPerforms at RBC Bluesfest Drive-In”, which will take place at the Place des Festivals Zibi Site in Gatineau. The first set of performances will be July 31 and Aug. 1.
  • Canadian border agents have turned away more than 7,500 foreigners – mostly Americans – trying to visit Canada for non-essential purposes, including sightseeing, shopping and recreation, since pandemic restrictions on travel were imposed.
  • The latest data available from the Canada Border Services Agency reveals that 7,639 foreign nationals were denied entry to Canada under the discretionary travel ban between March 22 and June 16.
  • Americans accounted for 87 per cent of those denied entry, with 6,615 U.S. citizens being sent home by Canadian border agents. The remaining 1,024 people denied entry were citizens of other countries not specified by the CBSA, CTV has more.
  • Globally there are now 8,400,320+ cases with 450,435+ deaths and 4,109,183+ recoveries.

For previous updates, visit: Tracking COVID-19: June 17